Views on Entitlement

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“Finding your life’s work involves taking risks.” ~ Dr. Henry Cloud and Dr. John Townsend

Ok, so, I am a self-professed personal growth junky. It comes from my interest in human behavior. I’m entitled to be that way, I suppose, as long as I don’t spend too much time reading about life rather than living it and enjoying the results.

An author, Dr. John Townsend, recently sent me an Advance Readers Copy (ARC) of The Entitlement Cure: Finding Success in Doing Hard Things the Right Way to review. I was psyched when it arrived in my mailbox! Why? Because as long as I am on this Earth, there is room for more self-improvement.

The book is dedicated “To all who live life the hard way, because life works best that way.” 

Haven’t most of us experienced some of that? In my own life I know faith and hope ( basic fundamentals) have kept me moving forward and optimistic when facing challenges.

greater-the-obstacle
Hard knocks bring the biggest challenges paired with opportunity for change and a reason to prove something to ourselves.

The good news according to Dr. Townsend is none of us are exempt from a little entitlement (he refers to this as pocket entitlement). We are made that way from our Creator and there is a cure for those who suffer from more entitlement than what is considered normal.

The author, Dr. John Townsend, a leadership expert, psychologist, public speaker and NY Times best-selling author of Boundaries gives strategies that help individuals understand that the “easy way” is not the best way. It is what brings about feelings of entitlement in the first place.

I highly recommend this publication. Here is more about the author and the book.

This blog is brought to you by EVVY award-winning author Sue Batton Leonard.

 

Are You Tweeting with Happiness?

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what-is-emotional-intelligenceA few weeks ago as I drove 388 miles south along I-25 between Denver, Colorado and Albuquerque, New Mexico I heard a story on National Public Radio’s (NPR) All Things Considered about human behavior and social media that peeked my interest. It was a timely delivery of a story because it gave me something to ponder in my boredom.

Did you know social scientists are studying the mood of the planet through individual’s activity on Twitter?

Rises and falls in biochemicals which affect circadian rhythms may have something to do with how we feel throughout the day. Scientists say by reading an individual’s tweets, they can follow people’s mood changes throughout the day. There is a rise in positive tweets first thing in the morning and then late at night .

If the research proves to be correct, pollers and marketers will find this information valuable – “as a great way to get a pulse of what’s going on in the country,” says Scott Golder at Cornell University. Golder and his colleagues look for positive and negative words used in the tweets such as “awesome, outgoing, pleasing” or negative kinds of feelings such as “afraid, fury or fear.”

Do you think reading people’s emotions through their activity on Twitter is constructive or destructive or just a time waster? In my opinion, also tracking seasonal differences in atttitudes would make the research more credible because seasonal affective disorder has very real symptoms.

I’d like to hear from you about the validity of a study about Twitter “tweets.” Post a comment.

This blog is brought to you by award-winning author Sue Batton Leonard.

Film Friday: Room to Breathe

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Did you know they are teaching mindfulness in schools? Today on Film Friday, I’d like to feature a multi award-winning documentary film about this subject.

Room to Breathe is currently being screened in select places across the country and both students and teachers are participating.

The purpose of the movie: is to educate others about the value of mindfulness, which means “paying attention in a particular way; on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally.” ~ Jon Kabat-Zinn

The potential value: better educational experiences for students and a changed, less stressful atmosphere for teachers.

Sounds like a movement towards a better world to me!

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I am going to take a “breather” on All Things Fulfilling until Monday. Over the weekend I will “find rest …because creativity needs a place to breathe.”

March will be arriving over the weekend. Early next week I’ll be sharing some of my last weeks fresh air travels to NM .

This blog is brought to you by award-winning author Sue Batton Leonard.

Preserving Thoughts

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When was the last time you thought much about the Dewey Decimal system? I did today! I decided to go to my favorite hang out in town, the Bud Werner Memorial Library to see where my publication Gift of a Lifetime: Finding Fulfilling Things in the Unexpected is filed on the bookshelves. Rather than hunt the library row by row, I took the easy way out and went directly to the computer. Sure enough my publication is on file 158.1 in the non-fiction section.

Since I am a curious soul, I wanted to see what other books it rubs covers with when it’s in-house at the library.  Interesting! Here are a few other titles in the same genre beside it:

  • Diana Looman’s Full Esteem Ahead: 100 Ways to Build Self-Esteem in Children & Adults
  • Denis Lovato: Staying Strong: 365 Days a Year
  • Oprah: Love Your Life!
  • Joan Lunden: Wake-Up Call

I love all books and but lately I’ve probably read more fiction than non-fiction. I find non-fiction helpful from an informational and educational standpoint. As Thomas Carlyle once said “All that Mankind has done, thought, gained or been: it is lying as in magic preservation in the pages of books. They are the chosen possession of man.”

Book at Bud Werner library

Personally, I think there’s a lot of truth in that statement and it is the reason I love to both read and write.

This blog is brought to you by Sue Batton Leonard. The award-winning author of Gift of a Lifetime: Finding Fulfilling Things in the Unexpected and

Short Stories: Lessons of Heart & Soul.

 

 

 

Retrospectively Speaking

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Getting over a painful experience is much like crossing monkey bars.You have to let go at some point in order to move forward ~ Unknown

monkey barsThe over the past few weeks in my blogging I have been remembering some of  my younger days. I’ve often stated on All Things Fulfilling the importance of living life forward and not looking back. Yet, I have mixed opinions on that.

For some people, like myself, looking back gives me a sense of my origins, roots and stability. That is a fulfilling feeling. I feel great security in my family and knowing that my parents were always there for me, no matter what. I recognize how fortunate I am. Not every person has that.

Secondly, the retrospective perspective, when written in memoirs can be a powerful tool if it is used to help us review and understand what has or has not worked in the past.There is value in that. The drawbacks come when we get stuck in hindsight because that  does not allow for forward movement. And I get that.

The other day I came across an article that I thought might be of interest to people who like myself enjoy writing about memories. Scientists have discovered that there are, indeed,  some very good reasons to look back. http://nyti.ms/1l30IYZ.
This blog brought to you by author Sue Batton Leonard. Click here for information on Sue’s memoir, Gift of a Lifetime: Finding Fulfilling Things in the Unexpected.

 

 

 

 

 

Crossing it from the Vocabulary

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cross_your_heart2God gave us the gift of life; it is up to us to give ourselves the gift of living well. ~ Voltaire

“Jine and Sue,” Fanny said one day, “I don’t want to hears you say it no mo.’ Not one mo’ time,” she said sternly.

“What?” Jan (my sister) or  (Jine, as Fanny called her), and I inquired, “ What were we saying? We aren’t doing anything wrong.”

“You is makin’ promises and sayin’  ‘Cross Your Heart and Hope to Die.’  Dats da worstest,” Fanny said shaking her head, “whoever made up dat sayin’ has gots it all wrong!”

Remember using that expression when you were a kid? Whoever came up with that lousy expression anyway? Researchers have learned so much about the effects of positive spirit on health. http://mayocl.in/1iigiNw.

Although I know I did say “Cross my heart and hope to die”  plenty of times in my childhood when making a promise, I certainly didn’t understand the meaning of it as a youngster. One thing I knew for sure, even though I never understood the magnitude of my childhood illness, is that I didn’t want to die! I had too many other things going for me- a menagerie of animals, a sister,  two brothers, parents and friends who I knew cared for me. And what about my beautiful grandparents and my funny Fanny? I didn’t want to leave any of them behind!

I think rather then taking prayer out of schools, and eliminating “The Pledge of Alliance to the Flag, Under God” from classrooms, “Hope to Die”  needs to be eliminated from all children’s vocabulary when making promises. Children need to know  “Cross Your Heart,” plain and simple, works much better.

Fanny always said, “If you thinks yo’ life is bad, go poke ’round in someone else’s for a little while! Dare is always someone on dis Earf  who ain’t got what you gots. Be grateful.”

cross your heart

As an adult, I know Fanny was right. In her own funny way she was trying to get my sister and me to realize that living well means having appreciation for all that we have been given, including choosing life.

Wondering more about what my funny Fanny said about living? You’ll have to read my memoir. I have had  many people contact me since my memoir “Gift of a Lifetime:Finding Fulfilling Things in the Unexpected”, was published who said “they wished they had someone in their lives who lived with such heart and soul when they were growing up.” Sue’s memoir

 

Cradled in a Hammock of Love

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There is nothing that moves a loving father’s soul quite like his child’s cry.” ~ Joni Eareckson Tada

Happy Fathers Day to all dads everywhere!

In retrospect, it makes me laugh when I think that we gave my father a hammock as a present one Father’s Day. If you read my memoir you will understand that my dad spent enough time rocking away his time when I was little, soothing my crying!

Peeps with his big catch May 2013He set a fine example as a father figure. My dad was not the kind of father who went off to the office and  left the raising of us kids entirely to our mother.  He was an active participant.  A father’s impact on his children is so important to their healthy development.  http://bit.ly/1hrAuwu.

We kids have been his loyal companions participating in all the things he’s always  liked to do -boating, fishing, skiing, building, crabbing, gardening and much more.

Today, I’d like to acknowledge all that my father has taught me and all that he put up with us kids. My twin sister and I were constantly nagging at him about this or that. “You girls are going to drive me crazy,” he’d say, when we became teenagers. Admittedly, my sister and I were enough to drive him cuckoo with our double trouble.

It’s no wonder he turned completely gray so prematurely at 27. I was probably way more than half the cause of it. (My son inherited his genes on that one!) It’s evident if you read my memoir I was lucky. I got to spend extra one-on-one time with my dad because of the circumstances of my birth. My sister and brothers have had her fair share of days alone with my father, however. Since I married, I’ve  always lived far from the rest of the family.

Even though my father thought we’d drive him crazy, there was never any no doubt that he loved us kids. We can just feel it and words are not necessary to explain it.

Happy Father’s Day, Peeps. 

P.S. I’m pretty sure that my sister and I didn’t drive him crazy! He is 86 years old and still very sharp!  He can remember the names of almost anyone he has met before. In my opinion, his four children and eight grandchildren are what has really kept him going.

This blog brought to you by Sue Batton Leonard, author of Gift of a Liftetime:Finding Fulfilling Things in the Unexpected.Sue’s memoir See you tomorrow on All Things Fulfilling.

 

Friday’s Hush

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Our greatest gift is the thunder of Silence.  ~Joel Goldsmith

It’s the end of the week, and the wisdom of the wordsmith in me says “that’s enough!”

Happy Friday everyone

Do return on Monday to All Things Fulfilling. You’ll be Looking at Lucky and I will tell you how that relates to my life. Some details of my journey weren’t  included  in the memoir Gift of a Lifetime: Finding Fulfilling Things in the Unexpected, so I’ll share more on this site. Sue’s memoir

Thoughtful Thursday: Opening Up Discussion

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trevor boehm quote

Happy Thoughtful Thursday! Today, I would like to share an interview that I had with Ali Boehm earlier in the week. She owns an award-winning healing business called “Kneading Hands” Massage. She is also the driving force behind a book, authored by her brother, Trevor.  The Boehm family published “Louie’s Saxophone” to help people struggling with mental illness.

Here is our interview:

Sue: Today is the first of many Thoughtful Thursdays to come on All Things Fulfilling. I continue to be inspired by your family’s story. The loss of your brother has been turned into a positive mission.  More than a year ago, I featured your brother Trevor’s award-winning book “Louie’s Saxophone” on All Things Fulfilling and I would like to feature it once more. http://bit.ly/1auIRSD

In a few weeks you will be participating in an event at Bermis Hall at Colorado College sponsored by the National Alliance of Mental Health. You will be sharing “Louie’s Saxophone” which has the potential to help many people. Tell me  more about the event.

Ali: On November 14th (at 6:30 pm) in Colorado Springs, CO I will be a speaking out, sharing our family’s experience at the National Alliance on Mental Illness. It will be an evening of story and song called Silence No More. People will also be reading poetry and expressing themselves through the power of dance. Kathy Brandt and Max Maddox will also be sharing their book “Walks on the Margins: A Story of Bipolar Disease.”

Sue: What will you will be specifically speaking about?

Ali: This time when I speak at the NAMI event, and now that more time has passed since the loss of my brother, I will be reflecting on what I think Trevor would be doing if he was still here with us.

Sue: Tell me what purpose you feel Louie’s Saxophone plays in helping people with mental illness?

Ali: That no one is alone. The book, in a gentle way, opens a door to talk about a sensitive subject matter. I believe that my brother’s struggles began at age 8, and a children’s book becomes a family place for education at a very young age.

Sue: What has your family learned about the power of books to change lives by  publishing Louie’s Saxophone?

Ali: People believe in the written word.  A book creates a space for reflection and gives power to legitimize the healing process. Initially we thought we’d do a pamphlet, but a book has more credibility.

 Sue: How does it make you feel to know that you are helping others by sharing the story Trevor left behind?

Ali: Humbled. The book is powerful and it puts me in a position that facilitates discussion. I do not have all the answers, and sometimes that is scary. But I can provide and find resources.

Ali: Where should people who are struggling go to seek help? Can you give me a few resources?

Sue: Ali, It’s been a good day if by publishing this interview on-line if we can help even a single person to know that they are not alone and they can open up about their own depression or sadness. Best to you with the NAMI event, I am so proud that you are part of We Write Steamboat networking group for independent publishers . You are sharing an important story.

This blog brought to you by www.CornerstoneFulfillmentService.com. See you tomorrow on All Things Fulfilling.

Changing Your World, As You Know It

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Minds are like flowers, they only open when the time is right.”
~Stephen Richards

Your world, as you know it, could end on Monday! You think I am kidding? Well, I am not!  

JoyOver the past few months, on All Things Fulfilling , I have hinted at a book that I feel is very valuable yet, I have not revealed the title of it. By now,  you are probably wondering if it will ever be exposed. Come back on Monday it will finally be posted. Consider this your “heads up!”

You might be asking,  “So, why is my world as I know it going to end on Monday?”

The answer:  With the release of the title of this book you are given an opportunity to change your life for the better. But, it is your choice. The inspirational tools inside the book, if followed, will help you remove self-doubt and start you down the path to living a more fulfilling life.

Since starting the business http://www.CornerstoneFulfillmentService.com in 1998 I have followed the principles in this book (and others like it) and positive results have followed. It has led me to “doing what I love and love what I am doing”. That includes networking with like minds and authoring over 1200 articles on All Things Fulfilling!

I look forward to the next step – it’s coming!  For starters, this site will finally soon have it’s new look and some other new things to follow, in the not too distant future.  Have patience and we will keep our promise.

Do return to this site on Monday! THE BOOK I’ve been hinting about will be announced.

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This blog brought to you by www.CornerstoneFulfillmentService.com.