Garbage Disposals, Houdini and Bulldozers

Leave a comment

“…goats is just like a bulldozer.” ~ Christine Genevier

goats on picnic tables 2Goats! What is it about their need to be atop sheds, dog houses, tables, cars, and everything else they are not supposed to be on? I don’t quite get it.

And talk about garbage disposals! We never had garbage disposals in any of  the kitchens of our three childhood homes even though my Dad’s company built custom homes with fancy features. We didn’t need them!

Our infamous goat, Hanratty, ate everything and anything in sight. Tin cans, fishing gear, toys, all the other animal’s food in our menagerie, whole turkey carcasses and more, in what seemed like one fell swoop! Everything went through that animal’s intestines including plastics but, the animal never needed a vets attention.

Every time you turned around, he was out of the pen and into something. Didn’t matter that we had just secured the pen, he found his way out.

If you are a baby boomer, you’ll remember the TV star in this minute or two video clip and you’ll know this catchy tune. Come on, sing along!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dny_JDlwGFM

This weeks blogs may be rather varied, without any particular theme. I’ll been using my stream of consciousness literary style once again. Wondering what that is? Here is a link to an article that you might find interesting if you are trying to find your own literary style.http://bit.ly/1nO4Bz2. Although I may be jumping from subject to subject most of this weeks blogs will be coming from childhood memories that keep cropping up. I’ll see what else I can dig up that you’ll enjoy from the days of what many describe as the “golden era.”

This blog brought to you by author Sue Batton Leonard. For more information on the award-winning book  Gift of a Lifetime: Finding Fulfilling Things in the Unexpected, visit this link http://amzn.to/1rNoUTm.  The book is available in audio, paperback and e-book for your reading pleasure!

 

 

Advertisements

Skipping Around with Images

1 Comment

Each one sees what one carries in the heart” ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

The assimilation process of language is interesting. It reminds me how important it is that parents watch their words to their children. One never knows what will come back to us from our offspring.  Words of beauty, compassion and understanding, are better echoed by our children than words of hatred and intolerance. To learn more about language assimilation of children, please read this article http://bit.ly/133mukU.

I come by my interest in flowers and gardening, naturally, through my parents. I never realized how much knowledge  I had assimilated about flowers in my formative years until I married a man whose father was a landscaper. Garden talk automatically became common lingo in our household when our lives converged. I am both surprised and delighted when our son whips out names of familiar flowers that have grown in our gardens. He has naturally ingested the names of many species.

I know what you are thinking. “Sue sure has gone out on a tangent this morning – Odd! Where is this subject matter coming from?”I am using stream of consciousness writing, today. http://bit.ly/117U99S.  A beautiful flower that I photographed at my parents house  started me down this path of thought.

This flower, digitalis (better known as foxglove) has always been present in my garden. But the blossom pictured, is the most beautiful of its kind I have ever seen. It could serve as a specimen plant because it is particularly noteworthy and deserves “center stage.” The stem is as wide as three stems fused together, and unusually flat shaped – a real treasure. Without the abnormally shaped stem, the heavy and enormous flower would topple over! When I saw it, it made my heart skip a beat.

Those are my fulfilling independent thoughts, words and views from www.CornerstoneFulfillmentService.com today. Come back tomorrow, perhaps my writing will be more cohesive.

digitalis 3 digitalis 1

digitalis 2

Photo 1: Check out the triple width stem of the unusually formed digitalis.

Photo in Middle:  Three ordinary foxglove (digitalis) and one hefty, atypical plant

Photo 3: Close up of atypical specimen of digitalis.

To read more about this species of flower, digitalis, please go to .http://bit.ly/11aZikG.