The Young Artists in Them

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Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up. ~ Pablo Picasso

On Friday, a number of nine and ten year old students, who are Junior Girl Scouts, expressed their love of writing during my presentation “One Day in the Life of a Writer.” When I admitted to my weakness of rising extremely early at 5:30am to 6pm to write and record what I have often been thinking in the middle of the night, a few said they, too, wake in the wee hours of the morning with ideas to put down on paper.
GS13 croppedSo, each junior Girl Scout was given a spiral-bound notebook to embellish with reflections of their own personality, design sense and color preferences. The notebooks are bound to hold up no matter where they travel and no matter how long it takes to fill the pages with words.They’ve been given a strong foundation backed with Duck© Tape! I never realized there are so many colors and patterns of Duck© Tape now available.

With a promise of returning to teach the Girls Scouts how to make paper roses, the group set about doing their own craft project after my presentation. The rest of today’s story will be told in photos – enjoy the colorful personal journal creations made by Girl Scout Troop #12622.

 

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Isn’t individual creativity a wonderful thing? Come back tomorrow to All Things Fulfilling, I’m looking for some opinions. And on Thirsty Thursday, you’ll enjoy a post called Spirit Not Withstanding!

Happy Cinco de Mayo from Sue Batton Leonard,  the award-winning author of Gift of a Lifetime: Finding Fulfilling Things in the Unexpected and Short Stories: Lessons of Heart & Soul.

From a Different Perspective

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“Won’t you come into the garden? I would like my roses to see you.”~Richard Brinsley Sheridan

A few weeks ago, my September/October issue of Poets and Writers Magazine www.pw.org  arrived in my mailbox. As I leafed through it, I was stopped by a letter to the editor written by a woman who had disappointments in her life that she was airing. 

What led to her writing the magazine was a letter of rejection she had received for a piece of flash fiction she was hoping to have published. She articulated her frustration at having spent the last nine years writing a novel and fifteen years penning a collection of short stories, with little hope of ever having them published. In the end, she said despite her disappointment, she “will go on” and keep writing. 

First, I felt sympathy for the woman. Her love of writing is obviously heartfelt since she has stated she will keep on writing anyway. 

 Secondly, I would like her to know that she is not alone. Rejections are not unusual. In fact, these days, having an agent to represent you may be one of the few ways to get your foot in the door with a traditional publishing company; they’ve gotten so selective. 

After I read her letter to the editor, I thought, “Why does this woman not know there are other publishing choices and options out there?” I want to help her.

She stated it was very important that her daughter, in particular, be able to read her work thirty years from now and laugh and feel connected. I can understand that and I assume she meant when she was gone, since this woman said she was in her sixties. 

Is that not also a reason why many people decide to independently publish? To pass work along to future generations?Somehow, I think the daughter would still love to have her mothers written words, no matter how it is published. 

Do you think a book would be any less fulfilling to her adult child, knowing the book was independently published? I would like to hear your thoughts on this matter. Feel free to post your comment.

These are my independent thoughts, words and views for today from www.CornerstoneFulfillmentService.com.

It is a Beautiful Thing!

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A child is an uncut diamond.” ~ Austin O’Malley from Keystones of Thought 

Don’t you just love it when you encounter a child who is filled with  excitement and passion for their world and they open up and invite you in to come along for the ride? That is exactly what happened to me on Thursday, as I sat down to meet with a third grader named Simone. 

Introduced to Simone’s mom, some time ago, she mentioned her daughter’s love of writing. She asked if I would be willing to get together with her and her daughter, to discuss the possibilities of independently publishing her child’s work. Finally we had a chance to meet and talk.   

Simone, smiling and proud, immediately placed one of her stories in front of me to read. As I perused the page, I went on a trip that if we hadn’t spoken another word, I knew what this little girl was all about. You could tell by the flow of the story and by her ebullient descriptions, this child is alive with a fun spirit and gushing with life. 

My thoughts were confirmed, as Simone began to speak. Her sparkling personality shined through. As she described her passion for writing, it was indeed reflected in the tale itself. 

As we departed, I said to Simone’s mother “Do all you can to keep that fire alive inside of your child. Let’s work together to see what we can do to work toward fulfilling her dreams.” I know first hand how rewarding it is to parent a child who has that kind of zest for life. It is a beautiful thing. 

I wish every child on this earth could find a teacher, a mentor, a parent or friend who could help them discover and nurture what moves them, what inspires them and makes them tick. 

If Simone follows her heart, there will be all kinds of good things springing forth from this child. I’ll bet she will want to share it with her readers, too. 

Keep on writing and reading, Simone. I enjoyed meeting you!

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