Blindly Chosen, Faithfully Read

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To build up a library is to create a life. It’s never just a random collection of books. –Carlos María Domínguez

March is just around the corner. Before we leave this heart-centered month, I wanted to mention an idea that came to my attention through my favorite hangout – our local library.

blind date with a book

 

On Valentines Day, the Bud Werner Memorial Library  provided an act of kindness through their Blind Date with a Book program. They set-up their library patrons up for an enjoyable night of entertainment.

The gift was wrapped up in brown paper, tied up with string, including a clue or two to help the reader make  their date selection. The title and author’s name was hidden and the reader had to accept on blind faith that what was “between the covers” was something good.

But as on any blind date, the only way to get acquainted with a character is to learn something about them. With time we get to know whether a character is as a mystery, a hopeless romantic or ready for a wild or steamy adventure. Sweet idea!

I’d like to conclude this writing today by repeating a bumper sticker that is frequently seen here where I live. One is on my car. It says “I came for the skiing and stayed for the library.”

What an asset to have a wonderful library in any community.

This blog is brought to you by Sue Batton Leonard, award-winning author of Gift of a Lifetime: Finding Fulfilling Things in the Unexpected.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Library Browser Finds

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“I took my time, running my fingers along the spines of books, stopping to pull a title from the shelf and inspect it. A sense of well-being flowed through me ….” ~ Beth Pattillo

I’m truly convinced it’s time well-spent allowing oneself a lengthy browse in a library. The other day I came across a book that if you read only one book this year, The Awakening of Miss Prim should be it. In my opinion, this publication that I randomly came across should be front and center of any library. For a short time, it probably was. But books, even the best, quickly get backlisted.

Old world libraryBriefly, the storyline goes like this. A woman takes a job as a private librarian in the small town of San Ireneo de Arnois. When she arrives she finds that the community, an enclave of sorts, is filled with villagers from the baker to the florist to shoemaker to bookstore owner who have fled from other places to settle where there is something special, “it’s unusually harmonious.” Most believe that by “returning to the old ideals of a simple, traditional, family-based economy” it is what is best for society.

Hailed as “an ode to the simple joys of life,” by Huffington Post, through this impeccably rendered fictional story one comes to understand why books, art, culture, civilty and philosophy matters. Without these things entire generations of people’s values and relationships with one another are altered.

This International Bestseller by Natalia Sanmartin Fenollera “set against a backdrop of steaming cups of tea, freshly baked cakes and lovely company” is a short, charming, and deeply thoughtful story. A treasure to behold for all readers.

An interesting side note: This debut novel was originally published in Spanish in 2013. In 2014 it was re-published in paperback, and in English.

This blog is brought to you by award-winning, debut author Sue Batton Leonard.

Helping Children Map a Future

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Here is the treasure chest of the world – the public library, or a bookstore.” ― Ben Carson, Think Big: Unleashing Your Potential for Excellence

Baltimore, Maryland. The home of Johns Hopkins University, Goucher College, Towson University, and many other colleges and outstanding schools in the greater Baltimore area.

A few weeks ago, I returned to Towson, in the suburbs of Baltimore, to do a book signing at Ukazoo Books for my memoir Gift of a Lifetime: Finding Fulfilling Things in the Unexpected. I found out something related to literacy and education that I didn’t know existed.

Towson, the town of my native roots,  is the home of The Carson Scholars Fund. This non-profit organization awards top performing students (both academic and humanitarian) through their scholarship program (Carson Scholarships). It also provides funding to schools to build libraries where children can learn to appreciate reading and books outside of a classroom in a comforting and warm environment provided for their enjoyment.

To date, The Carson Scholars Fund, which was started in 1996 by Johns Hopkins pediatric neurosurgeon, Ben Carson and his wife Candy has awarded 6200 scholarships and provided funding to 100 libraries. The scholarships have been given to deserving students in 50 U.S. States.
Ben Carson.We are so very fortunate to have in this country, outstanding citizens who are helping children map a future for themselves. Their generosity in giving scholarship money and building resources such as libraries and institutions of higher learning is what sets our country apart and makes it “America the Beautiful.” I read this book and I  put in on my recommended reading list.

To discover more about The Carson Scholars Fund, please visit and explore this website.http://www.carsonscholars.org/dr-ben-carson/general-information.

This blog is brought to you by author Sue Batton Leonard. For more information on her EVVY award-winning memoir, an anthology of stories called Gift of a Lifetime: Finding Fulfilling Things in the Unexpected, please visit this link. http://amzn.to/1vDFUMt

Treasures in Corners

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“Schools and libraries are the twin cornerstones of a civilized society.” ~ Nicholas Meyer

Bud werner libraryI have a very bad habit. As soon as I walk into our local library, the newly released books are front and center. Of course, I’m always anxious to see what’s hot off the press. The section begins with fiction first, and usually, I need not be enticed to venture any further. I find several books of interest and head over to the self-check out counter.

The other day when I was talking to my mother on the telephone, she mentioned she was reading Maya Angelou’s book I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and she asked “have you read it?”

“No,” I said, “I haven’t. I ought to get it.” On Sunday I went in search of the book at the library. Not allowing myself any dalliances with the newly-released section, I ignored it and went directly to the computer to look for the title in the catalog, and learned it was in the biography section. “Where’s that?” I thought.

I found it, in one of the far off corners of the library, where I need to venture more often. There was Angelou’s book on the shelf, and another I have been looking for.Cathie Beck’s memoir Cheap Cabernet: A Friendship was sitting on the same shelf as Angelou’s.

A few years ago, I made the acquaintance of Colorado author Cathie Back, through independent publishing circles. Beck’s success was the subject of my blog Using Stepping Stones, some time ago. If you missed it, here is the link. http://bit.ly/ZjfwHz.

Beck’s book, like many other independent publications are finding their way into libraries, including e-books.  Frankly, who is surprised? Non-traditional publishing has turned a corner. According and to the Miami Herald, the traditional publishing industry has been “upended.” To read the full article about the growth of independent publishing, please visit this link. http://bit.ly/ZjfwHz .

There is so much of value in all libraries, and I was reminded on Sunday, that I need to search out every corner of the library. Good reads go beyond the fiction section.

Return tomorrow to All Things Fulfilling, where sharing independent thoughts, words and views is all part of the business. This blog is brought to you by another memoir writer, Sue Batton Leonard.

Film Friday: Books for Indie Filmmakers

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“A good library will never be too neat, or too dusty, because somebody will always be in it, taking books off the shelves and staying up late reading them.” ~Lemony Snicket 

The holiday buying season will soon be upon us. In order to give you a head start on gift ideas for family or friends who are interested in filmmaking as amateurs or professionals, today’s blog will be focused on books about the industry. 

The Independent lists a selection of thirty books, many independently published, on things such as: 

  • Visual effects in films
  • Directing Films
  • History of Film and Cinematography
  • Finding success and fulfillment as a filmmaker
  • Legal issues of the film industry
  • Acting
  • Techniques for photography and filming
  • Film Editing
  • Film Distribution 

To see the list of recommended books, please visit this link. http://bit.ly/VaeoQQ.

Help your favorite filmmaker or want-to-be filmmaker build his or her library and career by purchasing one or more of these books to give as gifts this holiday! You will be giving a gift that will contain valuable information to reference from year after year. 

See you on Monday, for more independent thoughts, words and views from www.CornerstoneFulfillmentService.com.

Libraries Agree the Time is NOW!

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We are all faced with a series of great opportunities brilliantly disguised as impossible situations.” ~ Charles R. Swindoll 

Last weekend, I had an opportunity to read an independently published book written by Kristen Moeller, called “Waiting for Jack.” http://bit.ly/bUy3pu.  This book has been enormously successful, and I believe it is because many people can relate to the book’s message. The point of the book is to bring to light to the fact that many people live their lives saying and thinking things like, “ I will be happy and my life will be fulfilling when …….” 

You pick your poison, and fill in the blank as you see fit!  A  few times in my life have I fallen victim to this way of thinking, but I usually do fairly well at finding the best in any given situation. 

There was another very good point made in the book “Waiting for Jack” that I did fully relate to, however. That is the importance of thinking outside of the box. Never has this become so clear to me until I moved from my thirty-five year state of residence to a new state. All kinds of opportunities and possibilities made sense to me when I  began to move away from old ways of doing things and started anew. 

Our past few blogs have been focused on a very valuable agreement that has just been signed between the Douglas County Libraries and the Colorado Independent Publishers Association. This agreement, I believe, will be as author Kristen Moeller, would say “a fierce disruption of the ordinary.” 

The Director of the Douglas County Libraries, Jamie LaRue, has taken a bold and brazen step in removing the boundaries that libraries have operated within for many, many years. By no longer restricting the library from only buying books from the main six or seven publishing giants from across the land, libraries will be positioned to accept a new generation of books.  Electronic books (e-books) from independent publishers will move the library away from standard ways of doing business, into new-age bodies of work.

Evidently, the Douglas County Libraries, and the Colorado Independent Publishers Association have decided the time is NOW! I have a feeling, that as libraries move away from doing business as usual, in time the full ramifications of this new agreement will  be realized by both libraries and independent publishers – not just here, but all over the globe. 

Yippee! There will be more IPPY’s in coming years!

This blog brought to you by www.CornerstoneFulfillmentService.com.

Taking it All In

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Change is in all things sweet!” ~ Aristotle 

We are going to take a break from routine this Friday. I will be finding fulfillment  in Denver by attending the largest meet-up group in the country “Creative Connections” – a group of over 1,000 members strong! It is always a great day when communities of like-minded people can converse and network about things they have in common. 

On Saturday, I will be attending an historic event that will add a whole new dimension to the relationship between libraries and independent publishers. Jamie LaRue, Director of the Douglas County Library system in Colorado, will be signing an agreement that has been long awaited. The agreement will allow the libraries to acquire and lend e-books published by CIPA members www.cipacatalog.com without limitation, how is that? I will be listening and watching with rapt attention. It will be a day of celebration for those who have worked so creatively and diligently, together, to make this happen!  

More about Jaime LaRue – in 2007 he won the Julie J. Boucher Award for Intellectual Freedom. He is also the author of The New Inquisition: Understanding and Managing Intellectual Freedom Challenges. 

I look forward to sharing the news of the weekend with you on Monday. I believe this weekend will be the start of something really valuable for both libraries and independent publishers here in Colorado, and in time, everywhere! 

I’ll have a sip of champagne and piece of cake on behalf of all you independent publishers out there!

This blog is brought to you by www.CornerstoneFulfillmentService.com.